LeBron James’ Group to Help Pay Fines and Fight Voter Suppression in Florida

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LeBron James, shown in May from his Graduate Together appearance, has formed a voting rights group that is now helping ex-felons vote in Florida.

LeBron James, shown in May from his Graduate Together appearance, has formed a voting rights group that is now helping ex-felons vote in Florida.
Image: Getty

LeBron James is helping create the America we all deserve.

On Friday, James’ voting rights non-profit, More Than A Vote, announced that the organization is raising funds to help individuals with felony records vote in Florida.

In 2018, Florida citizens voted to give individuals with past felony convictions their right to vote again.

But the Florida legislature passed a law earlier this year that prevented these individuals from voting unless they paid off their outstanding court fees.

The campaign, backed by James, said it will donate $100,000 to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, an organization that was extremely influential in lifting the voting ban two years ago against those with felony convictions.

The money will be used to negate the court debts of prior felons looking to make their voice heard in the swing state.

James started More Than A Vote after the senseless deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, and Breonna Taylor ignited a national conversation on racial injustice and oppression. The group founded by James, which many other successful Black athletes and celebrities have attached their names to, will focus on fighting voter suppression.

The ACLU of Florida and NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund say that the new rule implemented by Florida legislators was unconstitutional and essentially created a poll tax to prevent individuals with felony records from voting. A federal judge said that Florida’s pay-to-vote rule “falls short in substantial respects.”

The debts to be paid out by James’ organization do not cover restitution that some individuals must pay to their victims.

According to a study, 775,000 Florida citizens with a felony record have debts that thwart them from voting. Many of these Floridians are pe

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